What does a ‘quiet week’ look like?

I don’t think a ‘quiet week’ ever exists for teachers.

Last week I had a fairly nasty cold, but really had to keep going in to school. My students completed an animal information report from our Australian Animal unit from the week before. We had a professional learning day on the Wednesday, which is something to write about another day. I submitted another assignment for my writing course and received the grade and feedback the next day. And I also celebrated turning another year older on the weekend.

I have updated my portfolio by adding my media release example from last week’s assignment. We had to write a media release for the launch of a new app. The information contained within the media release is all fictitious, including the website address and phone number. You can access the media release through my portfolio page or by clicking on this link.

 

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The Good, The Bad and The Frustrating

This week has had a bit of everything in it. Most teachers would find they have weeks like this. Let’s start off with…

The Good

We headed off to Healesville Sanctuary on Thursday for an excursion to see some Australian animals. We have been learning a lot about Australian animals over the last two weeks. It’s amazing to see the language taught in the classroom come together when we are out and about. Students also want to  communicate with us, because excursions are so exciting!

The bit that I didn’t get is when all them began shouting “Koala! Koala! Koala!” at the same to the poor sleeping creature in the tree.

Some of the other ‘Good’ for this week included some very impromptu and unplanned lessons that resulted in a lot of language being used. After the excursion, the students and I were exhausted on the Friday. So I gave them some finger puppets to make – a platypus, a kangaroo, a koala and an emu. The students had a great time making them and then I bribed them to come up the front in pairs and have conversations between their puppets. It was fascinating to see how much oral language came out from most of the students as they moved into the characters of their puppets. For ‘having-a-go’, and other good behaviour for the day, most of them got chocolate smelling stickers. I just wish I had recorded their conversations with my iPad.

 

The Bad

Believe it or not, the Bad was also Healesville Sanctuary. With a few challenging students from my class and a few challenging students from the other class that we walked around with, it certainly made for a challenging day. Throw into the mix the other teacher and I both had head colds and the public’s perception of what student behaviour should be on excursions…

 

The Frustrating

Being unwell whilst teaching is hard. But leaving work for another teacher can be harder. This week I just continued on. As did most of the other sick teachers at school.

This week also saw two of my students not telling me when they needed ‘to go’. That’s frustrating. Enough said.

This week also saw one of my students get so worked up in a fight with another student that he began vomiting. That’s frustrating. Enough said there too.

 

How’s your week been?

Whose Problem Is It?

Well I am certainly procrastinating this afternoon. There are many things I should be doing – like getting my head around my lessons for the next week or getting on with my latest writing course assessment task. Instead, I find myself more interested in planning a family holiday that we will take later this year, or thinking about my latest blog post.

I continued on with some social learning at school this week. We had a lesson on ‘Whose Problem Is It?’ This was inspired by my youngest son’s trip to his psychologist the week before. The psych was getting my son to think about problems and whose job it was to solve problems. I liked this idea. A lot! So I pinched it for my class.

It always seems to happen that at the week three to four mark each term at our school, social problems begin to emerge. Students have enough language to begin ‘dobbing’ (also known as ‘tattling’) on each other. The lack of language does not stop them either. I get “He…(gesture of a punch, kick or slap)… me!” Dobbing is not limited to one particular culture – I think it is just the stage that many six and seven-year-old children go through. It may be heightened for those children who do not have a sibling at home to begin learning how to get along with others.

Anyway, this week I scored:

“Mrs G, Student B colour his emu rainbow colour!”

And “Mrs G, Student C colour his koala yellow!”

And I had told them not to colour their emus pink or purple or their koalas green. (And past tense verbs are on my list of things to cover.) Cue me sighing and inward groaning and eye rolling. In the past I have even been told “Mum forgot to put my homework in my bag!” (really?)

So I made up a series of common ‘problems’ and spent a lesson with the students sorting them into groups. The aim of the lesson was for students to recognise that not all problems are their problems and to take responsibility for the problems that are theirs.

The four groups for sorting were:

  • Mrs G’s problems
  • Mum or Dad’s problems
  • My friend’s problems
  • My problems

 

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The picture above shows some of the scenarios given. (For the record I do not have a Jack or Anna in my class. They are fictitious students who do all sorts of things that my real students relate to.)

Some of the scenarios generated a lot of discussion, such as “Jack said mean things to my friend.” I was also really pleased that the students were able to generate more ideas for each of the four categories after sorting my pre-selected problems. Now I can say to my students when some dobbing occurs ‘Whose problem is it?’

Now I have a question for you. I will give you a scenario. This scenario is somewhat too common in our schools. I will then ask you the question: Whose Problem Is It?

A refugee student is struggling to learn at school. Whose Problem Is It?

  • Is the problem the student’s – who approaches everything with a negative outlook and struggles to retain even basic information?
  • Is the problem the parents’ – who maybe don’t understand their adopted country’s education system and are possibly struggling to stay positive themselves?
  • Is the problem the teacher’s – who scratches her head after trying all sorts of strategies including modelling a positive attitude to approaching learning and trying new challenges?
  • Is the problem the school’s – where the funding has been slashed and there is no longer support programs in place for students such as these?
  • Is the problem the wider community’s – who collectively needs to think more carefully about taking on traumatised refugees and provide not only housing and material assistance but also social and psychological support?

As for my current problem, what I should be doing, that is my problem and I take responsibility for it. But maybe I will go and play video games with my kids for a bit first.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Find out what it means to me

Aretha Franklin’s song lyrics have been ruminating through my mind over the last week or so. Respect can be hard to pin down and define, but it is definitely noticed when it is not present!

I have a challenging little fellow in my class this term who seems to have no idea of even the beginnings of respect. For the sake of privacy and anonymity, I will refer to him as Student B.

Respect is a two-way thing in the classroom. As a teacher, I try to show my respect to the students by treating them fairly and consistently, by listening to them, by minimising their embarrassment over mistakes or accidents and expecting them to have-a-go. Respect for my students is me saying ‘You are somebody. You matter.’

Students show respect when they look, when they listen, when they follow instructions, when they are not answering back or ‘in your face’. Respect from a student shows an openness to learning and a willingness to try something new or different. Student B rarely looks, rarely tries and rarely listens. He then expects my full attention when he wants it. His lack of respect makes him selfish and rude. Add in a strong sense of entitlement, and potentially this child will find it hard to learn to his full capacity.

So where do we learn respect? For ourselves and for others? Surely we learn this at home and through interactions with our primary caregivers?

I watched Student B leave after school the other week. He ran to his mother, dumped his bag, jumper and drink bottle on her and then reached up and ruffled her ears much like one would ruffle a dog’s ears. She just beamed at him, like he could do no wrong. Until she saw me and then looked mildly embarrassed. Student B just grinned when he noticed me watching him. I was shocked. My own three children would have been swatted away with a scowl and told ‘I’m your mother, not your wrestling buddy!’ if they had tried this with me.

Student B’s arrival in my class has prompted some social skills lessons. The other week we learnt about personal space and I had my students role play scenarios where someone got too close to them. They had to practise saying  ‘Stop it. I don’t like it!’ and ‘You’re too close. Move back!’ The challenge is to have offenders, like Student B, respect other people’s wishes. Student B has learned that Mrs G doesn’t like fish lips with kissing noises inches from her face. He is learning too that my no means no.

In an effort to understand him a little more, and get his mother alongside in terms of his learning, I set up a meeting with her, another teacher and a first language aide. It certainly provided some insights. His mother agreed that Student B likes to be first, the loudest and the best and that he is not shy about doing so. She mentioned that he didn’t begin talking in his first language until he was three years old which may explain his reluctance with speaking. When we asked her to allow him to take more responsibility for his own things and for things at home, she seemed to understand. But she may have a hard time following through. It is hard to break some habits.

Despite the meeting with his mum, Student B will continue to have his challenges.  I cannot force him to respect me but I can put in place my boundaries and expectations. He will learn and is already learning. I almost laughed, but not with joy, more with exasperation, when I heard his first English sentence this week. He was jostling with some boys about where to stand in line and came out with –

‘I am number one!’

 

Assumptions Not to Make in the English as an Additional Language Classroom.

The last two weeks have been crazily busy with family related things. My youngest turned 8 which required parties and presents, grandparents and cakes. These things are all fun, but did require some serious time for planning and execution.

My oldest, is getting ready for high school next year.  The big transition from Year 6 to Year 7 is looming. And the main issue for us is that we are out of zone for the school that we would like him to attend. So we have been going on school tours and making up application packages. Everything has now been submitted and we have to wait until August 9 to find out where he is off to next year.

Last week at school I was hit by some assumptions that I was making but probably shouldn’t when teaching six and seven year-old New Arrivals in Australia. So for a laugh, here are some photos and some assumptions not to make in the EAL classroom.

 

1: Don’t assume that students have had the same access to physical development programs as in your own country.

 

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This photo shows part of the Physical Education program that we run for the younger students at our school. We try to teach the language of ‘balancing’, ‘jumping’, ‘hopping’, ‘skipping’ and so on as part of the program. The students also need the body confidence and awareness to be able to learn effectively in the classroom. A lot of this learning would typically occur in Australia in Kindergarten programs and in the first year of school. My students are being prepared for the second and third year of school in Victoria. Three weeks into the term and most of our students are running up the ramp and over the A-frame with a jump onto the mat. This child has developed in confidence also, but is still hanging on with her hand as she negotiates the top of the A-frame.

 

2: Don’t assume that students will correctly colour in the flag of your country.

IMG_1213

 

This is Australia’s ‘official’ flag in terms of country recognition. I know we have our Australian Aboriginal flag but that concept is a little too much at this point for my learners. So despite talking about the Australian flag being red, blue and white and talking about the stars and the parts of the flag, and having a flag on display one student gave me this.

After all, stars are yellow, aren’t they?

They are, especially if you have a Chinese background, and you are six years old.

 

3: Don’t assume that copying is easy.

IMG_1214.JPG

 

This student was so proud of his work and I realised “Copying is so hard….” He copied the date and the sentence ‘Yesterday was ANZAC day.’  The second sentence was his. Compared to his peers, his drawing lacks maturity. There is a lot of work that needs to be done with this student both academically and in terms of overall maturity.

 

4: Don’t assume a student knows how to use a scrapbook.

 

 

This student completed a task at the start of his scrapbook. The next task was glued into the middle of his scrapbook and the last task was glued in near the end of his scrapbook. Oops! I had to get out the date stamp and stamp everything for when I go back through his work. Needless to say that this child is now on my ‘got to get to first’ list when we start new tasks so I can get him to the next page. Hopefully he’ll get the hang of it soon.

What assumptions have you made in your teaching or work? I’d love to hear some of your stories.

 

One week down, ten to go.

I heard someone once say, that teachers always know when the next lot of holidays are. That is so april calendartrue. It is ten weeks until the winter holidays. But we have ANZAC day this Tuesday and the Queen’s Birthday public holiday in June first.

I got home yesterday and crashed on the bed for half an hour before I could do anything.  It hurt to even think. There is research out there that says teachers make a lot of decisions every day. I felt like I had blown my weekly total.

I have a totally different class from last term. At the end of last term, I had ten students who were staying for this term so I thought I had a chance of retaining some of them. Nope. Not one. We had a huge influx of very young students and all of the older students moved up to other classes.

I now have 13 different students with five from the class below me and one from two classes below me. I have seven brand new students including two gorgeous little identical twin girls, with very similar and hard for me to pronounce names. So the process of starting with teaching routines, procedures and expectations begins again.

I haven’t done any more of my writing course this week other than to submit my assignment on Tuesday, for which I did really well.

Five things people I am grateful for this week include:

1 – My husband – who allowed me to ‘crash’ on the bed last night, before I could even think straight.

2 – My mother-in-law – who comes down and helps get the kids to school most mornings and does my washing and ironing for me.

3 – My mother – who came and took the kids on a long bike ride and picnic on Monday which enabled me to get the house cleaned before school started.

4 – My teaching partner – who is also in shock along with me over how young our classes are. She’s great to bounce ideas off and for the most part we think along the same lines with what we need to do with our classes which helps with consistency at school.

5 – The soy-chai-latte maker – I grabbed a soy chai latte on my way home from work on Friday as I had a ripper headache and couldn’t just go straight home. Sometimes it can be like going from the frying pan to the fire. Anyway, this barista served me a soy chai latte and a complimentary hazel-nut chocolate. Yum.

 

 

Why I choose not to do yoga

I have to explain why I am doing this post. For my writing course, I had to write an article for a fictitious yoga studio. The purpose of the assessment task was to show an understanding of different aspects of writing web content. The title of the article had to be ‘Boost Your Mental Power with Yoga’. Personally, I have tried yoga in the past but after going to a prayer healing night I decided that I needed to give yoga up.

Researching and writing this article have caused some personal tensions. On the one hand I want to do well with my writing and demonstrate that I can follow a writing brief. On the other hand I want to remain true to myself and my values. Should this have been a real life situation, I possibly would have needed to tell the client to choose another copywriter. For now, I have written a counter post to my article. My article you can find by clicking on my portfolio page.

I recognise that not everyone shares the same views as me. Should you wish to disagree with me in the comments section please do so.  Just be gentle.

 

Why I choose not to do yoga

Reason 1: I wanted to show God that He is first in my life

‘You must not have any other god but me’ is a commandment that I want to follow.  Not out of fear, but out of love and respect, I wanted to show God that He is first in my life. When yoga has its origins in Hinduism, there is the potential for competition between the gods of the Hindu religion and the God of the Bible. My God needs to be first for me.

Reason 2: Our bodies say things even when our mouths do not

Sun salutations may be a form of sun worship, which again does not make sense when it is a created thing and not the creator.  It could be argued that sun salutations are not true, but metaphoric. However metaphors often point to deeper things. There are many different poses in yoga and many of them are not explained within a yoga class. Without that explanation or understanding, what things might we be saying without realising?

 Reason 3: Yoga has been marketed to middle-aged Western women

I can say this, as I fit this market.

Yoga has been marketed to fit the west. Kamna Muddagouni in her article Why white people need to stop saying ‘namaste’’ writes:

Yoga, a spiritual practice with Hindu roots, has since been distorted into something more palatable for white audiences – a way to exercise and connect with one’s spirituality.

She goes on to say:

It’s about considering whether you can practise yoga without spiritually harvesting a culture and religion that is not yours when you have no deeper understanding, or desire to understand, the historical and social roots of the culture yoga comes from.

Ouch.

So in the West, yoga can be seen as the ‘in thing’, a commodity and a lifestyle choice. You can spend a lot of money on this trendy lifestyle choice and many people don’t know and don’t care about its origins.

Reason 4: Not knowing the deeper things behind yoga

If I wanted to I could find out the deeper things behind yoga, but I don’t really want to nor have the time to do so.

In the article

‘8 Signs Your Yoga Practice Is Culturally Appropriated – And Why It Matters’

(May 25, 2016 by Maisha Z. Johnson and nisha ahuja)

the authors write:

But lots of people include sacred objects in their yoga practice without realizing the significance of what they’re using.

Many people are ignorant not only of the origins of yoga, but also of the sacred objects and their meanings and that can include some yoga teachers!

Ignorance about yoga or other faiths is not uncommon but should we be doing things we don’t understand? In my classroom at school, I try not to the let the students say “Oh my god!” or even “omg!” or sit in different yoga poses for the reason that most of them don’t understand what these things mean.

Reason 5: Creek from ‘The Trolls’170414_Bg-creek

Creek from the movie ‘The Trolls’ didn’t leave a great impression for the things yoga and Eastern mysticism stand for. In some ways, he is actually taking the micky out of this life style. Creek reflects the Western way of doing the Zen way of life – it’s romanticised and diluted. And whilst anyone can turn on their friends, the fact that Creek sells Poppy and the other trolls out in order not to be eaten certainly doesn’t help his image. One could say that it is karma that he gets eaten along with Chef at the end of the movie by a forest flower!

(Picture sourced from Dreamworks Wiki)